MACC Hits 1600!!!

NEWS FLASH… Minnesota Advocates and Champions for Children Hits 1600!!!  Congratulations! The word is getting out to our Minnesota friends and neighbors!  Let us know if we can help you share with those important people in your life.  Do you have friends in other parts of the state?  Make a phone call.  Present a little information – try not to overwhelm at first.  Then each time present more in-depth information. This is our first mission!!  Inform and Educate.  Let’s get the news out!

The Value of a College Education

What is the value of a college education when the ideology of “superior race” is being taught and tested in Minnesota?
I received an interesting e-mail from an Augsburg college student. We all know that college texts ought to stretch one’s mind. However in this case, the student is questioning inclusion.   The student finds himself in a rather lonely position, as none of the other students speak up either out of fear or ignorance.  The book in question is “Essentials of Sociology” published by Pearson. Essentials of Sociology “advocates human cloning to advance “superior” traits and suggests that the only problem may be socially constructed familial relationships to the cloned individuals.”
“You might have heard people object that cloning is immoral. But have you heard the opposite, that cloning should be our moral choice? Let’s suppose that mass cloning becomes possible. Let’s also assume that geneticists trace great creative ability, high intelligence, compassion, and a propensity for peace to specific genes. They also identify a genetic base for the ability to create beautiful poetry, music, and architecture; to excel in mathematics, science, and other intellectual pursuits; even to be successful in love. Why then, should we leave human reproduction to people who have inferior traits — genetic diseases, low IQs perhaps even the propensity to be violent? Shouldn’t we select people with the finer characteristics to reproduce — and to clone?” (Essentials of Sociology, page 105)
Historically, does this remind you of another time and place?
  

Minnesota: It’s Time to Act! Caucus Night is Here!

It’s TIME to ACT!

The MACC Board strongly suggests sending one adult from each family to your precinct caucus tonight – Tuesday, February 4th at 7:00pm.  The Caucus is the foundation by which we enact change in each political party platform, like opposition to Common Core. The Resolution is a necessity for further action to be taken at the legislative level.   Print out your party’s “Resolution” and the “Whereas”.  Use the locator to find your precinct caucus.   Children are welcome.

“Whereas” statement that informs the uninformed about Common Core.  Staple this to the back of the resolution sheet and read aloud.   The “whereas” includes language that explains what common core is and how it came to be.

Common Core Caucus Resolution Whereas – Specifics

DFL Resolution Against Common Core to be read.  Staple the whereas behind this sheet.   The “resolution” explains steps for removal.

2014 DFL Common Core Caucus resolution

Republican/Libertarian Resolution Against Common Core to be read.  Staple the whereas behind this sheet.   The “resolution” explains steps for removal.

2014-GOP -caucus-resolutions-form

Caucus locator for DFL and Republicans.

http://caucusfinder.sos.state.mn.us/

Independent Party?  There is an online caucus.

http://www.mnip.org/get-involved/caucuses/live-online-caucus

If there is ANY part of this educational program that you do not like, it is IMPERATIVE that you attend. This is a GROUP EFFORT for your children and our children.  We are depending on each other!

Precinct Caucuses serve several purposes:

1. It’s The Start Of Choosing Candidates
Caucus attendees will elect delegates who will endorse individuals to become your Party’s candidates at the BPOU, CD and State level.

On caucus night, you’ll be able to cast a straw ballot to indicate your preferred candidate for Governor and for US Senate.

2.  It’s Where Precinct Leaders Are Elected
Local, grassroots leaders are the backbone of politics in Minnesota. A commitment to advance your principles qualifies you to accept this leadership role.

3.  It’s the Base of Grassroots Efforts
Precinct caucus attendees make great volunteers for candidates and the State Party in the coming months. We cannot move forward without your involvement.

4.  It’s The Start Of The Platform Process
The resolutions that are passed at caucuses are the starting point for changes to your Party’s standing platform, which states the Party’s principles and beliefs.

While the political process starts February 4th, it does not end there. Over the next several months, there will be a variety of opportunities for you to support your candidates and your State Party.

 Caucus Terminology:

BPOU: Basic Political Organizing Unit. The local party unit which may be a county, state house district or state senate district.

Call: The official notice of a party convention or meeting.

Convention: A party meeting of party leaders who have been elected by fellow activists.

Delegate/Alternate: A person elected to represent their group at higher party meetings. Delegates and alternates are usually elected based on the candidates or positions that they support.

Endorsement: When the delegates vote as a party unit to support a candidate, the endorsed candidate may then receive party resources to support his or her election efforts. However, endorsed candidates must still win the party’s nomination at the primary election.

Nomination: Candidates must be nominated before their names will be listed on the November election ballot. Major party candidates are nominated by winning the state primary election in August.

Party Platform: The statement of principles and issue positions that guide candidates, workers and members of a political party.

Precinct: A voting district containing one polling place.

Resolution: A written statement of an idea, issue, concern or action for people to consider at a caucus for possible addition to that party’s platform.

General Tasks at Caucuses and Conventions:

  • Election of local party leaders
  • Election of delegates and alternates to the next level of conventions in the DFL structure
  • Discussion of proposed resolutions to the DFL platform and Action Agenda
  • Endorsement of Candidates
  • Deliberation of party unit constitutional changes

The Four Levels of Caucuses and Conventions:

Precinct Caucuses

The precinct is the first level of the Party structure. A precinct is comprised of the voting precinct which can be a township, an entire town, or a voting precinct within a larger community. The precinct caucuses are a foundational pillar to the Party’s grassroots history because all Minnesota constituents have the ability to participate at this level.

Those in attendance have an opportunity to speak with candidates, participate in a preferential ballot, and compose resolutions that have the potential to be forwarded to their local unit conventions and the state convention for deliberation for acceptance to the official party’s Ongoing Platform and Action Agenda.

Have a scheduling conflict on caucus night? Know your rights: Minnesota Statutes Section 202A.19 permits Minnesota residents to take time off from work without pay to attend precinct caucuses provided they give their employer written notice at least 10 days in advance. State universities, community colleges, and public schools may not hold classes or events after 6:00 p.m. on the evening of precinct caucuses. State agencies, school boards, county boards, township boards, city councils and all other political subdivisions may not conduct meetings after 6:00 p.m. on caucus night.

Organizing Unit Conventions

The Organizing Unit is the second level of the Party structure. Delegates are elected to their Organizing Unit conventions at their local precinct caucuses. Then, these delegates will endorse candidates for the state legislature and choose delegates to move on to the state and congressional district conventions.

Like at the state party level, organizing unit and senate district conventions are generally held on even-numbered years, with a few exceptions. The organizing unit central and executive committees are the governing bodies of the organizing unit between conventions. 

Organizing Unit/Senate District Convention Tasks:
  • To endorse candidates for State Senate and House
  • To conduct local party unit business
  • To present and consider platform resolutions

Congressional District Conventions

The congressional district, an area established by law for the election of representatives to the U.S. Congress, is the third level in the structure. The boundaries of congressional districts are determined by State legislature and are dependent on the population of the state and the number of U.S. representative seats given to Minnesota. In general, each congressional district is to be as equal in population to all other congressional districts in the State.

Between conventions, the congressional district central and executive committees are the governing bodies of a congressional district party unit. On even numbered years, Congressional district conventions are held with delegates who have been elected at the party’s organizing unit conventions.

Congressional District Convention Tasks:
  • To endorse Minnesota candidates for U.S. Congress
  • Elect members to State Commissions and committees for the State Convention

 State Convention

At the State Convention, Party members:

  • Endorse candidates for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, secretary of state and state auditor, and U.S. Senate.
  • Elect Party officers
  • Present and deliberate proposals to the State Party Constitution and Bylaws
  • Consider proposed resolutions to the Party Platform and Action Agenda

NY Teachers Union Pulls Support of Common Core and Ask For Removal of Education Chief

Link to Story:
NY Teachers Union Pulls Support of Common Core and Urges Removal of State Education Chief

The Board of Directors of the New York State United Teachers, a union with more than 600,000 members, has approved a resolution that withdraws its earlier support for the Common Core State Standards ”as implemented and interpreted” by the New York Education Department. It also declares ”no confidence” in the policies of State Education Commissioner John King and calls for a three-year moratorium on high-stakes consequences from standardized testing.

The action is a blow to supporters of the Common Core, which was approved several years ago in 45 states and the District of Columbia but which has become increasingly controversial around the country, with a number of states…..